Have you ever stopped to think about how many people may have searched online for the services or goods that your ecommerce business provides, but haven’t found your site despite the fact you’ve spent hours fine tuning your SEO? The chances are that those who aren’t finding your site are using the internet in a language other than English. Could multi-lingual SEO have a positive effect on your ecommerce business?

It’s something you may have completely disregarded in the past, but have you ever stopped to think about how many people may have searched online for the services or goods that your ecommerce business provides, but haven’t stumbled across your site despite the fact you’ve spent hours fine tuning your search engine optimisation to help it rank well on Google? The chances are that those who aren’t finding your site are using the internet in a language other than English. Could multi-lingual SEO have a positive effect on your ecommerce business? And if so, how do you go about implementing such a strategy?


The Facts

Contrary to what we may believe in the English-speaking world, the internet most certainly isn’t presented in a single language; almost 75% of all internet users do not surf the web in English. Although it’s true that English is the most common language used online, Chinese, Spanish, Japanese, Portuguese, German, Arabic, French, Russian and Korean are also extremely widely used and well over a billion people combined worldwide use the internet in these languages. A massive 100million Chinese-speaking internet users purchased something through ecommerce channels last year, which just goes to show how big the potential market is that you’re missing out on targeting if you don’t use multi-lingual search engine optimisation.

Google isn’t King Everywhere

Again, English speakers assume that because Google is the search engine of choice in English-speaking countries, it’s also the leading search engine everywhere in the world. This however is certainly not the case; Baidu is China’s favourite search engine and actually is the 5th most visited site on the web as a whole. South Koreans prefer Korean-language search engine Naver, whilst the Czechs favour Seznam and Indians believe that Rediff provides them with more accurate search results than Google India. This shows that if you want to target a foreign market, you need to make considerations for the different algorithms of their preferred search engines if you want your SEO to be successful.

What to Start Thinking About

The most important thing you have to remember if you’re seriously considering search optimising your site for multiple languages is that search engine culture varies greatly from country to country. For example, using accents in search queries in French can turn up completely different results compared to when accents aren’t used. The Spanish language has many dialects and searches for the same query in these different dialects are also likely to produce different results. What this means is that you have to accommodate for all these different variations in your SEO if you want to effectively optimise your ecommerce site for multiple languages.

The Next Step

Simply because of the size of the markets you can target for ecommerce if your site is search engine optimised for multiple languages; it’s certainly something worth looking into. A good piece of advice however would be to seek professional help if you’re serious about multi-lingual SEO; it’s a complicated process and it’s best to leave it to the experts to make sure you’re going to achieve the kind of results you’re looking for.

About the Author

Bough SEO are a UK SEO agency based in London who provide professional SEO packages to cater to the needs of almost any business. Get in contact today to receive you’re very own tailor-made quote and discover just what search engine optimisation may be able to do for your business.